Saturday, June 25, 2011

Review Book - Freshwater Fish of the Northeast

The 2nd book I received from Amazon is Freshwater Fish of the Norhteast.  This book is exactly what it sounds like.  There are fantastic drawings and some details on each fish.  If you're a fisherman you probably know what's in 95% of this book.  I did learn a lot on the baitfish in the waters around here though.  There really is nothing left to say, the book is straight forward and pretty short.  It is a bit pricey at $22.  I would say it's not worth it for the average person.  If you are a naturalist or are interested in art then it may be for you.  It will make a good addition to my library.  Here is the link to amazon for anyone that wants to purchase it.

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Review: Book - Cache Lake Country

I was recently on the National Outdoor Book Awards website going through previous winners trying to pick what interests me.  I made a list and purchased a few from amazon.  The 1st one I purchased was Cache Lake Country. Here is the amazon description.....

Winner of the 1999 National Outdoor Book Award: Outdoor Classic Category.Over half a century ago, John Rowlands set out by canoe into the wilds of Canada to survey land for a timber company. After paddling alone for several days—"it was so quiet I could hear the drops from the paddle hitting the water"—he came upon "the lake of my boyhood dreams." He never left. He named the place Cache Lake because there was stored the best that the north had to offer—timber for a cabin; fish, game, and berries to live on; and the peace and contentment he felt he could not live without. Cache Lake Country is a vivid and faithful chronicle of life in the great Northern Forest and a storehouse of valuable information on woodcraft and nature. Here is folklore and philosophy, but most of all wisdom about the woods and the inventiveness and self-reliance they demand. The author explains how to make moccasins, barrel stoves, lean-to shelters, outdoor bake ovens, sailing canoes, and hundreds of other ingenious and useful gadgets, all illustrated in the margins with 230 enchanting drawings by Henry B. Kane.

I really enjoyed this book because it shows another side to living life in the wilderness.  The author had two friends that lived only a couple miles away.  One of the author's friends was an old Indian Chief.  This book is full of the many wisdoms that the Chief taught the author.  It's twelve chapters long, one month per chapter.  This book is not all about great adventures but it does a great job of telling a story of making due with what you have and loving every minute of it.  On almost every page there are small drawings in the margin's depicting things that the author mentions.   I highly recommend this book.  At $11 how can you go wrong.

If you would like to purchase this book you can find it on amazon by clicking here.

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Rain...Rain...RAIN...

Four straight days of rain.  Not just drizzle rain, I'm talking monsoon downpour rain.  I'm talking rain with thunder and lightning that lights up a room at night and shakes the house.  Raining cats & dogs is an understatement.  I shouldn't complain because the lawn and garden are getting watered pretty well.  Also, my truck has never looked cleaner.  The downside to all of this is that I can't get out and do any of the things I enjoy.  So what does one do? Read!  I read two outdoors related books in the last four days.  You will see some reviews shortly.  With the rain keeping me indoors I've also decided on a new domain for my other project.  If it wasn't for my mic not working with my iPhone I'd be farther along.  Here are some photo's of the rain so you can see for yourselves.

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Tuesday, June 14, 2011

Smarter Than The Average Bear?

There are certain things that never fail in the wilderness, such as a beautiful sunset/sunrish over a mountain and seeing game out of season.  Today at the range a black bear stepped out and nonchalantly walked down the range.  My iPhone was in the truck so I grabbed it quickly and thankfully he stepped out between the target frame's so it was easy to get the spotting scope in him.  The close up shots were through a spotting scope with my iPhone.  I hope I see you in September!

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Monday, June 6, 2011

Peaked Mountain Hiking

A few months back I hiked the Miller Tract area, well this morning I hiked the other section down the road called Peaked Mountain.  It's a 1227' summit that overlooks Monson.  It's a quick and simple hike that's close to home.  It's 2 miles (depending on which way you go up to the top).  We choose to go up and around to both vista's and back down.  The weather wasn't bad it was in the 70s and there were scattered clouds.  I was hoping to see if I could see any of the tornado damaged area's of Monson.  The view was good but we weren't able to see any of the damaged area's. I've been using an app on my iPhone called Accuterra.  It's a great app that records the your tracks, shows trails, records multiple data, and let's you export it for other to view it on google maps.  The link to my trip through accuterra is here.  The link is only good until July 6th.

The trail map for both Millers and Peaked can be found here.

Wednesday, June 1, 2011

Fishing "New" Water

It's been probably 20 years since i've fished Red Bridge.  I do remember bits and pieces of my last trip because it's a family joke that's been told for years and years.  Red Bridge is another section of the Chicopee River, just farther upstream.  It's 106 acres with a max depth at around 33'-35'.  I arrived at the boat launch at 5:15am just as the sun was creeping over the treeline.

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We're expecting severe thunderstorms today so I knew I only had a few hours of fishing before I was caught in the storm(s).  I started fishing cover and caught a small bass barely bigger than the Rat L' Trap I caught it on.  I then decided to give some of the Berkley Havoc baits another try so I can finish up my review on them, but didn't have  any luck.  The wind picked up drastically and I spent the remainder of the day exploring and fishing banks with a Mepps Aglia gold spinner with a rooster tail.  I marked the underwater structures and continued to fish the banks hoping I could get the whole body of water in before the thunder. 

I came across a fallen tree creating a pool around it and I knew something had to live there.  I casted the Mepps and saw something trailing it.  I paused a minute and BAM a good sized Crappie hit it. Shortly thereafter I caught a panfish, then heard loud cracks of thunder so I put the rod's away and motored back to the launch and called it a morning.  It was a productive morning for the time I put in.  I got some good info on the river but only half of it.  I'm looking forward to getting info on the other half of the river next time I go out.

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